LinkedIn’s Answer to Your Quarter-Life Crisis

If you’re 50 or older, I’m sorry. You’re now past the point of even having a quarter-life crisis, or statistically even a mid-life crisis. A quarter-life crisis is something that happens around age 25 or so. And, if you think about it, that all makes sense.

When you’re in your early to mid-twenties, you’ve probably graduated from college and have some sort of a career. And, you’ve probably settled down, at least a wee bit, on the dating scene. Maybe you’re married. Maybe you’ve at least got a steady “main squeeze”. One thing you probably have a lot of is debt, both college debt and credit card debt. Career, relationships, and finances are the three pillars, if you will, of someone’s life in their twenties and thirties. And, managing all of these can, and quite frankly does, cause a lot of stress in a lot of people!

You might have thought of LinkedIn as a platform that’s more geared to older folks. And, in a way, that’s true. Only about fifteen percent of LinkedIn users are under 30. That’s not stopping LinkedIn from catering to that age group. This is a move that makes total sense. If you get hooked on LinkedIn early in your career lifetime, you’re more likely to stay involved with the platform, which leaves little room for competing business platforms to move in on LinkedIn’s market share.

One of the ways that LinkedIn has decided to cater to younger professionals is through their new feature Career Advice. According to LinkedIn themselves, Career Advice is “a new feature that helps connect members across the LinkedIn network with one another for lightweight mentorship opportunities.” You basically sign up for Career Advice right from your LinkedIn profile. When you do you can specify what type of advice you’re looking for.

This is a brilliant move on LinkedIn’s part! There are over half a billion professionals on LinkedIn. It’s as if the entire group of business professionals on planet Earth are available to you. With Career Advice, you can seek guidance from people who’ve been there and done that. If you haven’t taken advantage of this valuable resource, you might want to give it a go! (Note: It’s not just for youngsters, either!)

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